Lesson Plans

Activity: #critlib zine

Topic: Information Literacy, Social Justice
Rationale: Brief discussion about #critlib based on homework. What is #critlib? Watch video of Dr. Safiya Noble about “Algorithms of Oppression.”
Objectives:

  • Students will be able to accurately and succinctly describe critlib in their own words.
  • Students, independently or with a partner, will be able to create a brief zine about a critlib subject of their choosing.

Materials: Magazines, paper, glue, scissors, tape
Assessment: Presentation of zine to group

Activity: Mini-presentations

Topic: Information Literacy, Social Justice
Rationale: Students (individually or in pairs) will select an institution or librarian engaged in critical librarianship or social justice. Students are responsible for researching this entity in preparation for a 10-minute presentation to class.
Objectives:

  • Introduce students, and instructors, to broad interpretations of librarianship through the lens of social justice or critical information literacy.
  • To expand upon the definition of what it means to be a librarian, or to how to deliver information literacy.

Materials: Materials used are dependent upon individual student preferences: powerpoint, handouts, etc.
Assessment: Individual or group presentations.

Activity: Grad School Jigsaw

Rationale: Each group of three students receive three schools. Research and present one school to entire class.
Objectives:

  • To learn about the breadth of and requirements for different graduate programs.
Materials:
University of Washington
University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill Syracuse University 
University of Texas—Austin 

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey—​New Brunswick
University of Maryland—​College Park 
University of Virginia - Rare Book School   
 
University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign
University of Michigan—Ann Arbor
University of Delaware - Art Conservation Master’s 

Study the program website (or do some sneaky googling to read people’s experiences on forums, blogs, etc.). Consider some of the following questions to guide your inquiry:

  • What are the requirements for admission? 
  • Are online classes/programs offered? Does this matter?
  • What sort of classes are being taught? Which classes appeal to you? 
  • Are there special degrees offered like Archives & Preservation? Digital Librarianship? Services for Children & Youth? Law Librarianship?
  • What about dual degrees (MLS/MA, MLS/JD, etc.)?
  • Can you tell where the faculty come from? Are any of them currently working as librarians?
  • Is the school accredited? Does it matter?
  • Anything surprise you about looking at LIS program web sites?

Assessment: Groups present their findings on one school to the entire class.